Child Support

Child support is fixed by law in New Hampshire, and is for the most part, a mathematical calculation, in which the incomes of both spouses are added together and then after offsetting certain standardized deductions, to include but not limited to mandatory pension, state income taxes, daycare and health insurance expenses, the resulting figure is applied to a table (updated annually for cost of living increases) and the child support figure is established.

The total child support figure varies based on the number of children receiving support and the parents’ combined net income level.

Usually the non-residential parent then pays a percentage of the child support as reflected by his or her income over both parent’s combined income. While there are exceptions to the application of this rule, it is, for the most part, applied rather rigidly and mechanically by our trial courts, and is in fact, required by state and federal law.  However, if one parent earns significantly more than the other parent, then even a parent that has more parenting time can be required to pay child support to the lesser earning parent.

It should also be noted that a shared parenting schedule in and of itself is not a reason for the Court to deviate from the child support guidelines.   There needs to be other factors considered in order for a deviation to be approved by the Court.  Some of those factors include, but are not limited to, payment of other expenses for the children.

I can analyze your financial situation and seek, to the extent possible, to maximize your position on the issue of child support consistent with the requirements of our current law and system.